Water Pollution

FDA’s Definition of Safe Does Not Mean Harmless

FDA DEFINITION OF SAFE

Their definition of safe in regards to drugs approved by the FDA is “When it comes to any drug, ‘safe’ means that the benefits of the drug outweigh the risks for the population the drug is intended to treat and for its intended use. Safe does not mean harmless.”

Not all drugs produced by big pharma are water soluble, that means they don’t dissolve in water, they linger and stay there just like the human body.

Some doctors assume the drugs metabolize thru the liver and after three months they disappear magically in your body, sure if they were water soluble but they’re not, they recycle in your body after getting lodged in your fat cells. And they get re released back into your bloodstream from your fat cells and then leave your body long term in your urine and stool. The FDA is aware of these facts. You will never hear about this in mainstream cause their advertisers are big pharma, they don’t want to lose their advertising dollars informing the human race of the truth.  Money is more important then human life, then human beings.

I sent the FDA an email and this was their response:

FDA is aware of reports of very low but measurable levels of medicines in surface waters such as rivers and streams, and to a lesser extent in drinking water. The majority of medicines found in water are a result of the body’s natural routes of drug elimination (in urine or feces).

As previously noted, to better understand the human health and ecological risks from medicines in our water, FDA works with other agencies, including the EPA. FDA encourages safe drug disposal methods to reduce overall medicine levels in our waters.

Additionally, please note that the FDA does not have jurisdiction over the regulation of tap water, EPA has regulatory authority over tap water.

https://www.organicconsumers.org/essays/drugs-drinking-water-dont-ask-and-officials-wont-tell

http://www.foxnews.com/story/2008/03/10/study-finds-traces-drugs-in-drinking-water-in-24-major-us-regions.html

https://www.pharmaceutical-journal.com/news-and-analysis/features/pharmaceuticals-in-the-environment-a-growing-problem/20067898.article

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170831101457.htm

http://michiganradio.org/post/antidepressants-are-building-fish-brains-great-lakes-region

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4840956/Antidepressants-fish-brains-Great-Lakes-region.html

So, they do all these studies but at the end of each study, there is no solution, how to solve this problem of pharmaceuticals in our water. So the problem never gets solved and just continues, making the human race sicker and sicker and sicker.

Here’s what Merck says including explaining how drugs get lodged in your fat cells, they’re honest about it.

http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/drugs/administration-and-kinetics-of-drugs/drug-distribution

Once absorbed, most drugs do not spread evenly throughout the body. Drugs that dissolve in water (water-soluble drugs), such as the antihypertensive drug atenolol, tend to stay within the blood and the fluid that surrounds cells (interstitial space). Drugs that dissolve in fat (fat-soluble drugs), such as the antianxiety drug clorazepate, tend to concentrate in fatty tissues. Other drugs concentrate mainly in only one small part of the body (for example, iodine concentrates mainly in the thyroid gland) because the tissues there have a special attraction for (affinity) and ability to retain that drug.

Some drugs accumulate in certain tissues (for example, digoxin accumulates in heart and skeletal muscles), which can also act as reservoirs of extra drug. These tissues slowly release the drug into the bloodstream, keeping blood levels of the drug from decreasing rapidly and thereby prolonging the effect of the drug. Some drugs, such as those that accumulate in fatty tissues, leave the tissues so slowly that they circulate in the bloodstream for days after a person has stopped taking the drug.

Distribution of a drug may also vary from person to person. For instance, obese people may store large amounts of fat-soluble drugs, whereas very thin people may store relatively little. Older people, even when thin, may store large amounts of fat-soluble drugs because the proportion of body fat increases with age.

The cities and states waste water management systems were never designed to handle these problems when they were created 50 or more years ago, so they don’t remove everything from the water and that’s the reason their drugs are showing up on the studies and of course ending up in rivers and lakes etc etc.

You can’t rely on your city, state nor country to protect you and your family from this. You need to educate yourself as well as your family and friends so you and they can solve this problem for yourselves.

It starts with solutions, water purification for you, your family and your friends.